vineyard Archives - V. Sattui Winery

Magical Wine Tourism Experiences at V. Sattui, During the Most Magical Time of the Year

Come for the award-winning experiences, stay for the holiday fun!

V. Sattui Winery has become a true Napa Valley tradition. Recently awarded “Best of Innovative Wine Tourism” for 2023 by Great Wine Capitals, V. Sattui was selected as the regional winner for Innovative Wine Tourism Experiences, along with 10 top wineries around the world—proving the prestige it has come to establish since its original founding over 40 years ago.

“I am so proud of our winery team being selected as the best of wine tourism experiences for all of the Napa Valley, along with being included with the best of the major wine regions from around the world!” exclaims, President Tom Davies. 

When Dario Sattui reimagined his great grandfather’s namesake winery, he envisioned a destination where friends and family could come together and experience the joy of wine, food, and camaraderie – a place where memories could be made, lifelong friendships forged, and where people from all walks of life would feel welcome from the wine novice to the oenophile. 

V. Sattui Winery’s iconic tower is now a beacon of warm Italian hospitality beckoning newcomers to their first unforgettable taste of wine country, while generations of families and friends return each year to enjoy award-winning wines, house-made artisan foods as diverse as the wine portfolio, incredible eventsincluding the first and longest running Harvest Ball in the Napa Valley – and life’s special milestones from birthdays to weddings

As one of the most visited wineries in the U.S., V. Sattui welcomes nearly 300,000 visitors from across the country and around the world each year with a culture that embraces and celebrates our differences. This deep commitment to inclusion and accessibility has inspired a wine portfolio more expansive and diverse than any other single brand. Offering these wines direct-to-consumer only has allowed V. Sattui Winery to build meaningful, lasting relationships with their customers including one of Napa Valley’s longest-running Wine-of-the-Month Clubs and a Cellar Club membership of over 20K. 

Another distinctive element that sets the winery apart from its contemporaries is the culinary program.  From the beginning, Dario’s vision was to share the Italian tradition of alfresco dining, and, as no other winery in Napa Valley had done before, he opened an Italian Deli and Marketplace, giving guests the opportunity to take part in one of life’s purest pleasures – enjoying leisurely wine country picnics with their favorite wines and delicious house-made delicacies, charcuterie, and over 200 cheeses, all conveniently available. 

Over the last 46 years, this program has expanded far beyond a Marketplace. V. Sattui is the only winery with its very own Italian Michelin Star Chef – Stefano Masanti. Stefano spends six months of the year in St. Helena as V. Sattui’s special events chef preparing spectacular multi-course meals for weddings and events. A master of charcuterie, Stefano oversees the winery’s Salumeria (his bresaola was just awarded Best Bresaola in all of Italy for 2023). In addition, his tempting house-made gelato and sorbetto are staples featured in the V. Sattui Marketplace. V. Sattui also employs the culinary talents of executive chef Fatima Hafiz who brings her vision to the weekend BBQ and seasonal specialties in the deli while the in-house chocolatier, Katryana Zide creates melt-in-your-mouth confections and artisanal truffles.

V. Sattui’s innovative experiences don’t end there. The winery was the first to sell “en primeur” wine Futures in the Napa Valley. Each year, approximately 10% of select vineyard-designated wines are allocated to this program, initially released in January at the highly anticipated Barrel Tasting Party. Guests can sample as many as 30 wines, thieved directly from the barrel, and purchase these wines at special pre-release pricing. This is such an important tradition for members and friends, even a pandemic couldn’t stop the demand. In 2021 V. Sattui held its first-ever virtual Futures Barrel Tasting Party. Attendees received sample bottles and tasting kits to be enjoyed at home alongside an entertaining live Zoom broadcast. This Virtual Barrel Tasting Party was so well attended, it continues to be offered in 2022. Visitors to the Members’ Cellar Club will find the current vintage wines in barrels to sample as they age and develop – adding an exciting layer to educational current release tastings. 

V. Sattui Winery’s beautiful grounds are a natural destination for celebratory events, especially wine country weddings. Their events team facilitates spectacular, beautifully curated affairs that draw thousands of visitors to the Valley annually, who enjoy breathtaking celebrations of life’s most important moments, bringing further business to hotels, restaurants, and other wineries. 

Once built on word of mouth alone, V. Sattui Winery’s widely visited website and robust social media presence (58K followers on Facebook, 30K followers on Instagram) are key components in building their brand and in turn, promoting visitation to Napa Valley.  

Passionate about the health of tourism in Napa Valley, Winery President and CEO, Tom Davies is the Chairman of the Board of Visit Napa Valley for the fiscal year of 2023 and was recently honored in 2022 by the Napa County Farm Bureau with the Friend of Agriculture Award. V. Sattui Winery is a proud supporter of the RLS Middle School, the Napa Valley Grape Growers’ Fields of Opportunity, the Boys and Girls Club and Meals on Wheels – paving the way for the next generation of wine and hospitality professionals creating a vital and sustainable economy for the future of wine tourism. 

Ring in the holidays with V. Sattui!

The season of giving is upon us, and this year V. Sattui Winery is dedicating the entire month of December to celebrating our beloved four-legged friends – those who bring us joy every day of the year and especially those who are still seeking their forever families and homes. Please join us this month for our first-ever PAW-lidays Pet Food Drive benefiting the Napa County Animal Shelter and We Care Animal Rescue, St. Helena!

All month long, we invite you to bring a donation of new, unopened dog or cat food (wet or dry) on the day of your visit and receive TWO ADDITIONAL wine pours of your choice with your paid tasting.

And for those of you with pups that love nothing more than spending the day with their human in wine country; bring them along to V. Sattui (in their favorite Holiday outfit, if they have one) on Saturday, December 17th for the ulti-mutt holiday experience!

Go ahead, do your holiday wine shopping while you do good with your best furry friend by your side. Does it get any better? Happy Paw-lidays indeed!

Magnums: The Ultimate “Party Size” and Much More!

Bigger is better in more ways than one.

Learn why from one of our long-time wine experts, Chris Rota, who has been with V. Sattui for over 25 years.

At the supermarket, we have all become accustomed to larger packaging and the psychology attached, such as “Jumbo Pack” or “Value Pack” or “Sharing Size”. Every potato or corn chip offers a package touting the moniker “Party Size”.

When it comes to the world of wine, nothing says party like Champagne, and producers have been marketing party sizes for over 150 years naming them after Biblical kings, such as Methuselah or Balthazar. The largest size would be a Nebuchadnezzar (20 Bottles) which was named after the King of Babylon. However, a few houses produced even larger sizes such as the Solomon and the mighty Melchizedek (40 bottles). I think the latter comes packed with a crane. By and large, when one of these monsters entered a room, guests would fall silent. That said, these massive bottles of sparkling were made specifically for show. No fermentation ever occurred in a monster bottle; rather, completed Champagne in 750ml bottles were carefully poured in and corked.

In wine, size is much more than just volume…

Besides looking impressive and creating great focal points in a cellar, bottles larger than 750ml actually store and age their contents better and longer. This dimension transcends by far “the life of the party”. It emphasizes the concept of placing a skin around a volume of wine, be it wood, steel, or glass, and it takes on its own life i.e., development and aging trajectory.

Perhaps it’s the ratio of oxygen in the ullage of a bottle (space between cork and fluid) and how it assimilates into the wine as well as how it reduces in the wine over time. Bottle aging is really a process of reduction in which molecular chains become longer, softening tannins, and creating complexity (read wisdom and grace). Depending on the quality of a given vintage, one can age 2 or 5 years, even a decade longer in larger vessels.

Here are the standard large formats wine packages:

                                                                  750ml equivalent

Magnum                            1.5 Liters         2 Bottles

Double Magnum              3 Liters            4 Bottles

Imperial                             6 Liters            8 Bottles

Nebuchadnezzar              15 Liters          20 Bottles

Magnums

Of all the bottle sizes, the Magnum performs the best over time, and nobody can really explain this phenomenon.  It’s akin to how the best olives come from trees with multiple trunks. Nobody knows why, but that’s the way olive growers train their trees. I have personally experienced this and ironically it was at a party. V. Sattui Winery, where I have worked almost 25 years, throws the best parties in the Napa Valley. Unpretentious, yet filled with grace, style, food, and fun; these events are nothing short of magical. During this particular soiree, one of the venues of the evening was to feature library wines and I happened to be pouring a 2002 Suzanne’s Vineyard (now Vittorio’s Vineyard) Cabernet. It was a high point of the party and as fate would have it, we ran out at the height of the evening.  As lines and disappointment continued to grow, I had to do something; so, I brought in some magnums of the same wine. The fruit was still very much intact yet highlighted in the backdrop of sophistication that can only come from age. It was utterly amazing, and it reminded me of the wedding feast of Cana where the steward said, “Why did we serve the best wine so late in the party?”

Life of the Part: V. Sattui Magnums

I suspect some ideas are fomenting here. Anytime you have an age-worthy wine that you intend to lay down, particularly from a stellar vintage, I think you should anchor that inventory with 4 to 6 magnums. This, of course, will extend your enjoyment of a favorite wine and/or vintage. When you are sharing one of those 750ml treasures with special friends and guests (i.e. those who know and appreciate wine) or when you and your guests are tasting through a vertical of vintages; do the following. Compare that gem with a magnum of the same wine as an eye (and palate) opener. Or select the best vintage of a vertical and punctuate the string years with that magnum. Be prepared for gasps and swoons.

Decant your large format wines.

Of course, a magnum of great wine will always dazzle a party. I recommend having decanters handy, as they are much easier to pour than the large bottles. Also, have the “Wine-of-the-Evening” magnum(s) on display for your guests’ anticipation of something special to soon be enjoyed. And if your occasion celebrates one of life’s precious hallmarks, consider using a large format bottle as the guest book at the reception.  Enjoy the empty, signed bottle as a sentimental memento from the event for years to come.

Giving “Big”

Magnums by their sheer size, weight, and presence, make impressive gifts for the Holidays and beyond. Be sure to check out our specially curated collection of Anniversary Magnums sporting Cabernet from our flagship vineyards, stellar vintages, from ready to cellar (2018) to exquisitely aged and at the zenith of their trajectory. Great gifts and great savings – not a bad combination.

Anniversary Celebration Magnums Sale.

But there’s more. While the overt size catches attention, what’s inside engages appreciation at a whole new level. Ultimately the collective, social message implied is loud and clear…

“Wine is always better when shared with friends.”


 

Climate Change & The Future of Farming

Shifting Climate, Extreme Weather, Wildfires, Demand for Housing, Water Scarcity and Drought

One of my favorite quotes about farming comes from a fellow grape farmer and good friend, Stu Smith of Smith Madrone Vineyards on Spring Mountain, nearly 2,000 feet above the valley floor.

Stu says, “Being a farmer, you have to be an eternal optimist but at the same time you have to be an eternal pessimist. So, it is these two emotions that are driving you, and in conflict within you, that you have to live with.”

 

When visiting with guests at the winery, I find myself complaining about the du jour weather-related factors affecting the crop.  Perhaps complaining about weather is part of the DNA of a farmer, and there is good reason for this, as weather plays such an important part in the growing of grapes and resulting wine quantity and quality.  The frustration that plagues farmers is that weather is out of our control, and this is mostly true, but not completely.  More about this later.  For now, let’s discuss what is happening with climate in the Napa Valley and other extreme weather and economic conditions.

The planet is getting warmer.

The last 7 years have been the warmest since record keeping and 2020 tied for the hottest year on record.  In North America, June 2020 was the hottest month on record.  Andrew Isaacs, Professor of Technology Programs, Haas School of Business, Berkeley, and former Senior Scientist at NASA, says climate is travelling at 1 km per year in the Napa Valley.

What does this mean?

It means that each year, as you drive from south to north in the Napa Valley (Napa towards Calistoga) the weather is getting slightly warmer.  It is not a perfectly linear as you move north, as individual sites vary in temperature depending on orientation and site specifics, but in general it is a good description of what is happening with the climate.  This data is important, in that specific varieties do best when matched to the ideal growing conditions, which considers mean degree days of heat.   Could this mean that one day the Carneros region, best known for cooler conditions that favor Chardonnay and Pinot, could be better suited to warmer varieties like Cabernet and Zinfandel?
Could Rutherford and St. Helena become too warm for Cabernet?  Yes. 
High-quality wine grapes are naturally adaptable to heat stress if managed correctly, as grapes like to grow in a warm, Mediterranean climate, but at extreme temperatures, heat can cause grapes to shrivel and turn to raisins.

Wildfires and resulting smoke damage to grapes and resulting wines have affected every vineyard and vintner in the Napa Valley.  Virtually no Cabernet Sauvignon will be made from Napa Valley grapes in 2020 because of smoke damage from the wildfires.  Estimated economic damage from just the 2020 wildfire season to the Napa Valley wine industry alone is estimated to be more than $2 billion.  With a warming planet, it is easy to become pessimistic regarding our predicament, as a quick fix is not possible.

I believe the biggest threat to our livelihoods as wine growers is water scarcity.

 

For the first time in my 41-year career in the industry, we ran out of water at two of our ranches in the Napa Valley and had to truck re-claimed and municipal water, at an expense approaching $250,000, just to save two-thirds of our crop. Some farmers dropped all their fruit and used the little water they had just to keep the vines alive (vines carrying a crop require more water).  Grapes  are plants and need water, especially when they are young and root systems are not established. Drought in California is nothing new and we have made excellent wine in drought years, but limited water is not the same as being out of water.

The future of farming in Napa is further endangered by state-mandated housing requirements that are spilling beyond our cities and threatening the once sacred agricultural boundary lines. McMansions, huge 10,000 square foot+ homes with large outdoor entertainment spaces, are encroaching on valuable Ag lands – reducing future vineyard plantings. Additionally, it is becoming nearly impossible to plant new vineyards on lands zoned for agriculture, as the cost and time of conducting environmental studies and obtaining the necessary state and local permits required to  plant a vineyard favors only the very wealthy.

It is becoming evident that one of the most famous and desirable locations in the world to grow world-class wine is in jeopardy of its existence.

 

What can we do?

 

1. DROUGHT TOLERANCE

❉ Vines and cover crops that are planted between the vine rows compete for water during the growing season. During drought years, we disk between the rows during the growing year to eliminate the competition, giving all the available moisture in the soil to the vines.

❉ Redeveloping our trellis systems to provide more shade for the fruit during the hot summer days.

❉ Dry-farming vineyards, that is farmed without irrigation, as was done in the early days of the Napa Valley.  Once vines are established, it is possible that some vineyard sites have water sources  down deep, and eventually the roots find these sources, as deep as 50 feet for more. Our Dry Creek, School House Old-Vine Zinfandel is completely farmed without adding irrigated water. These  old vines found an underground spring of School House Creek!

❉ When we redevelop or plant a new vineyard, we search out rootstocks that are drought-resistant, and can survive with less water.

❉ We have begun working with a partner that has developed an irrigation model through extensive research in both California and France that pinpoints the best time to water that will accelerate vine growth early in spring and push fruit to an earlier ripening that would improve fruit quality and quicken harvest by nearly 30 days, while minimizing the risk of smoke taint from wildfires that typically happen in late Fall.

2.  REDUCING OUR CARBON FOOTPRINT

Anytime we reduce tractor passes in a vineyard, we reduce CO2 released into our atmosphere. Electric tractors have already made an appearance in the Napa Valley, but more work needs to be done to improve performance.  Vineyards are naturally a carbon sink, in that carbon is reduced over time by farming as compared to development and housing.

Back in 2007, we installed solar on the roof of our wine warehouse and plans are underway to install more throughout the property.

3.  FIRE MITIGATION

Here, we are making great strides. Industry groups such as Napa Valley Grapegrowers are leading the charge to help farmers with best practices to mitigate fire losses.

❉ What hurt most in the 2017 and 2020 wildfires was that we were not prepared and relied too heavily on firefighters that were stretched to nearly the breaking point, as fires raged throughout the state.

❉ We are a strong agricultural community where grapes have been grown for more than 150 years. We have survived floods, earthquakes, Prohibition, and numerous other disasters.

❉ Climate change, wildfires, economic threats, and water scarcity are all worthy adversaries, and will challenge us, but will not beat us.

We have too much at stake

to give up on the bounty and beauty of this magnificent valley. As farmers and eternal optimists, we believe next year’s harvest will be the best ever!

 

 

 

 

Tom C. Davies
President


Did you know there is an island of plastic trash in the Pacific Ocean three times the size of France?

8,000,000 metric tons of discarded plastic finds its way into the ocean EVERY YEAR. That is the equivalent of setting five garbage bags full of trash on every foot of coastline around the world.  Plastic production rose from 2.3 million tons in 1950 to 448,000,000 million tons in 2015. Production is expected to double to 896,000,000 tons by 2050. Half of all plastics ever manufactured have been made in the last 15 years.  Plastic has a very long life. It contains additives which makes it unable to break down for 400 years or more. Today, landfills are overflowing with waste plastic. China is now refusing to take our unwanted plastic to its country as it did several years ago.

Plastic “trash” is killing sea life and birds and poisoning our food and water supplies. “If plastic production isn’t curbed, plastic pollution will outweigh fish pound per pound by 2050,” declares World Economic Forum Report.  THIS IS AN ALARMING PROBLEM.

Action is required. It is in this spirit I have invested in a company called Resynergi of Santa Rosa, California, which will take most discarded plastic and turn it into energy or chemicals for making new virgin plastics without harming the environment.  This process is called CMAP, Continuous Microwave Assisted Pyrolysis. Discarded plastic is collected and heat of 1000 degrees Fahrenheit is applied – in an oxygen free environment – causing the solid material to form a gas. The gas is cooled into a liquid product (fuel) or made into new plastic.

NEW! Collina d’Oro Chardonnay & Pinot Noir

The most impressive aspect of these wines for me is the stunning and bountiful fruit aromas, and the complexity of flavors on the palate. The wines evolve with just a few minutes in the glass to provide lush fruit and great acidity on the finish…

– Brooks Painter, Director of Winemaking

Nestled in the Russian River AVA in Sonoma County, just outside of the town of Forestville, famous for its unique “Gold Ridge” sandy soils and cool coastal influence – the newest edition to our portfolio of Estate vineyards, Collina d’Oro is the idyllic setting for Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.

Each block of this 15-acre vineyard – formerly a 50-year-old organic Gravenstein apple orchard – is planted with careful attention to clonal diversity and varietal expression. Six unique Pinot Noir clones including DRC, Pommard and 777, enhance the dimension and complexity of our Collina d’Oro Pinot Noir, while our Chardonnay is planted to the classic Wente clone – perfectly suited to this exceptional site.

Both wines offer deep aromas and luscious, layered fruit with fleshy, dense volume in the mouth and succinct minerality all at once – showcasing the Russian River AVA at its very best in Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.  We are delighted to offer these two new beauties as a part of our collection.

2017 Collina d’Oro CHARDONNAY

Aromas of green apple, lemon and vanilla introduce this bright, crisp Chardonnay. Fruity and juicy on the palate with bold yet balanced oak and buttery notes punctuated by minerality and firm acidity – our 2017 Collina d’Oro Chardonnay is fine example of the unique characteristics offered by this special vineyard.  $48/bottle

BEST CHARDONNAY, 95 Points & Platinum – Winemaker Challenge
BEST CHARDONNAY, 95 Points & Platinum – Monterey Wine Competition
95 Points & Double Gold – American Fine Wine Competition
Double Gold Medal – SF Chronicle Wine Competition

2017 Collina d’Oro PINOT NOIR

Elegant and beautifully balanced, this Pinot Noir has aromas of ripe cherry, vanilla, a hint of savory herbs and black tea. On the palate it is bold, rich and refined with a hint of dusty cherry. A luscious, full mouthfeel is enhanced by silky tannins and a long, satisfying finish.  $52/bottle

91 Points & Gold – Winemaker Challenge
91 Points & Gold – San Diego Int’l Wine Competition
Gold Medal – SF Chronicle Wine Competition

A Wine Drinker’s Top 5 Resolutions for 2019

Attention all wine drinkers! This one’s for you. If you’re a wine-o, then your New Year resolutions list probably looks something like this: add more V. Sattui Winery to my life! Pretty accurate, right?

Resolution Number 1: Wine + Food Pairing Experience

You might have heard of this one before, and you’ve probably thought to yourself, “I really want to do this,” but still haven’t acted on it. Well, now that experiencing one of these popular pairings is on your resolutions list, let’s make it happen for you! This is way more than just a food pairing. Firstly, you are greeted by your host with a glass of our sparkling Prestige Cuvée and taken on a guided tour of our estate Vittorio Vineyard and production areas. You then make your way down to the underground barrel aging cellar where your preset seating pairing awaits at our long Italian tables. What happens next is magic.  Our wine expert will lead you through six mouth-watering seasonally-inspired culinary creations paired with six highly-awarded V. Sattui wines as you are educated on the flavor dance between fats and acids, salt and sweet, complements and contrasts. Step away from this experience understanding how food and wine improve when paired properly.  Reserve your seat now for February 16 or March 16 from 11 am – 1 pm and cross resolution number one off the list!

 

Resolution Number 2: Take a Tour of V. Sattui Winery

When you take a tour of V. Sattui Winery, you immediately become part of the family. Our welcoming and edu-taining hosts dive into our rich history while you discover your soon-to-be favorite V. Sattui wines all while taking in the Tuscan beauty of the property, estate vineyards, and manicured grounds. During the tour, you will learn about our winemaking practices, the Napa Valley Agricultural Preserve, and what it means to be a responsible steward of the land along with the rebirth of the winery following Prohibition. At the end of the tour, guests will be treated to a full complimentary tasting! Daily tours take place daily: Monday through Sunday; reservation required (resolution encouraged).

Resolution Number 3: Partake in a Junk Food + Cabernet Pairing

If you’ve read our previous Cabernet Season blog, you’ve heard of this one. Now you actually have an excuse to experience it for yourself while it’s on your resolutions list. The next time you come by the winery, be sure to upgrade your tasting to this one-of-a-kind seasonal experience. Your favorite junk foods paired with award-winning Cabernets — it’s a match made in heaven. This isn’t the only unique upgraded cabernet experience we’re offering either, the options are endless!

Resolution Number 4: Eat More Cheese!

Now this one’s easy! With over two hundred cheeses from all over the world in our Artisan Deli, you can fulfill this resolution all year long. Grab the crew, your favorite bottles of V. Sattui wine, as many cheeses as you can carry, and picnic right on the property. Our on-site cheesemonger will help you pick the perfect pairings. And for dessert, treat yourself to homemade tiramisu, crème brûlée, seasonal fruit tarts, or our own Italian-style gelato. It’s a new year, so why not indulge?

Resolution Number 5: Drink More (V. Sattui) Wine!

This one might be the most important on your resolutions list this year. It’s important to take time for yourself, relax after a long day, and enjoy a glass (or two) of your favorite V. Sattui wine. Even better – share it with friends!  We offer a variety of wine clubs to fit your liking, making it easy to drink more wine at home all year round. The best part, it’s delivered right to your door! Membership perks include invitations to the best parties in the Napa Valley.  In fact, Lobster Fest is just around the corner and sold out six weeks in advance last year!  Lock in your membership now to get your invitation to this member-only event.  Be sure to also check out our wine specials throughout 2019 as we are always offering amazing deals on our award-winning wines!

As you cross these resolutions off your list in the New Year, be sure to share your experiences with us and tag us on social media! Cheers to 2019!

Vittorio’s Vineyard

Just as their heritage is innate to California, winemaking is innate to the Sattui family. It’s an insatiable yearning for creation and connection with the vine that courses through their veins and busies their wine-stained hands. And the first Sattui hands to work magic on California grapes nearly 140 years ago were that of Vittorio Sattui, the winery’s pioneer and namesake. Vittorio passed long ago, but his legacy lives on because he dedicated his life to nurturing one of the only things that’s worth chasing and fighting for, the thing that fosters dreams and fuels visionaries, and one of the only things that lives on forever – land, which he captured in his wine. Vittorio’s Vineyard remains the heart of the winery and a testament to the Sattui family’s relentless and galvanizing story in American winemaking.

original-winery

The Sattuis with their original winery

In 1882, Vittorio and his wife left their home in the hills of Italy, crossed the world to California, and began making wine. As the Sattui family grew, so did their success. Vittorio and his sons were moving wagons of grapes from the untouched region of Saint Helena to their home winery in San Francisco until the Sattuis’ lives came to a halt with the passing of Prohibition in 1920.

dario

Dario perfecting his craft in the Napa Valley

However in 1941, unbeknownst to the family, the winery was resurrected with the birth of Dario, Vittorio’s great-grandson. Dario’s restless hands and Sattui blood longed for the one thing that would suffice, and as soon as he was old enough, he set out to apprentice and finish what Vittorio started. In 1976, he reopened V. Sattui Winery in St. Helena and shortly after adopted the neighboring 34 acres – Vittorio’s Vineyard.

vineyard-replanted

Planting new roots in Vittorio’s Vineyard

Earlier this summer, a portion of the vineyard’s old, tired vines were freed from years of growing and succeeded by young Sauvignon Cabernet roots. This new generation of grapes is a handsome offering to the land, whose original vines and old soil will raise them beautifully for the next few years, ready them for their first harvest in 4-5 years, and continue the Sattui legacy – a perfect parallel of Dario rekindling his great-grandfather’s dream. Because for almost 50 years, Dario, the winery, and Vittorio’s Vineyard have produced award-winning vintages season after season and handcrafted cabernets that swept the state, and they will, undoubtedly, continue to pay homage to the paragon that was Vittorio Sattui.

Make a reservation and experience the soul of the Sattui family first-hand in a Guided Tour or at our Terrace Tastings overlooking Vittorio’s Vineyard.