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V. Sattui Blog

Kyle (Resident Foodie)
 
November 18, 2013 | Kyle (Resident Foodie)

Day-After-Thanksgiving Turkey Soup

 

 

1 quart brown chicken stock

1 quart vegetable stock

1 turkey carcass, with meat removed

2 bay leaves

12 whole black peppercorns

2 tablespoons grapeseed or olive oil

2 garlic gloves, smashed and chopped

1 onion, small diced

1 carrot, small diced

1 stalk of celery, small diced

3 cups mixed vegetables

3 cups dark turkey meat, small to medium diced

2 teaspoons dried thyme

1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary

1 tablespoon chopped fresh italian parsley

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Remove the turkey carcass and discard. Strain the stockpot contents into a container and set aside.1.  Put the stock, turkey carcass, 1 bay leaf and 6 peppercorns in a stock pot and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer for one hour, uncovered.

In a large soup pot over medium heat add the oil and garlic. Stir until the garlic just starts to brown. Add the onion, carrot and celery and stir. Reduce the heat to medium-low and continue cooking for about 7 minutes, stirring often. Add the stock, remaining bay leaf and peppercorns and bring to a simmer. Add the mixed vegetables, turkey, thyme and rosemary seasoning. Bring to a simmer, cover, turn off the heat and let sit five minutes. Remove the bay leaf and season with salt and pepper to taste. The peppercorns will sink to the bottom. Serve in warm soup bowls.


Serves 8

Kyle (Resident Foodie)
 
December 12, 2012 | Kyle (Resident Foodie)

Persimmon Pudding Cake paired with 98 Vintage Port

Reprinted from http://www.sippitysup.com/christmas-coming-persimmons-getting-fat-persimmon-pudding-cake

Big and rich, with intense fruit flavors like blackberry, black cherry, candied orange and chocolate, with a touch of spice and herbs.  The combination of fruit and spice complements the flavors in Greg's Persimmon Pudding Cake nicely.  I like how the cake's sweetness offsets the port's own sweetness, which ensures liveliness and balance in the pairing.  Made from classic Portuguese grape varieties (and some Zinfandel), this Californian dessert wine finishes with refined tannins and elegant persistence, and is reminiscent of many fine Portuguese vintage ports.

Port is another example of one of those "happy accidents" which were so prevalent throughout wine's history (Champagne being my favorite!).  In an effort to stabilize the red wine bought back in barrels on the the long journey from Portugal, the British added distilled alcohol to the wine.  In at least one instance, the addition of spirits to a not fully-fermented wine halted the fermentation process, resulting in high levels of sugar and an elevated alcohol level.  Since then, the process has been refined, resulting in the wonderfully sweet yet complex pleasure we know today as port.

Grant Henry



Where I live the persimmon trees have already dropped their leaves. I love how stark they look. Gray tangles silhouetted against a gray sky with just a few crimson orbs dangling from their branches. I've lived in Los Angeles so long that I've come to consider the persimmon tree the real true Christmas Tree. The first harbinger of the season. The first hint that the holidays are coming. You can almost smell the sweet spice of them. I try to stop and savor this moment every year, because we all know that the stress of the holidays will soon follow. The weight of them will soon be felt.

But right now– they seem so enchanting, so full of possibility and promise.

Take fruit cake. Every year about this time I think to myself, "I should make fruitcake". The idea of fruitcake seems so romantic, ripe with holiday spirit and good intentions. So full of possibility– so promising. But then the calender clicks off a few more days. The big day looms more near. My to-do list grows. Suddenly I remember all the hassle involved tracking down all those gummy neon colored fruits. Besides, nobody really likes fruitcake. They (like me) have romanticized that little confection all out of proportion.

So before I get to that point. Before the possibility and the promise fizzle out like the last candle on the 8th night. I plan to make fruitcake.

But this fruitcake holds all of the promise and none of the burden. Because you will love this fruitcake. I made it with persimmon. Hachiya persimmon. Its pudding-like pulp will add just the right note of sweetness to this very dense, very moist "fruit" cake. I hope you'll consider this Persimmon Pudding Cake. My gift to you. Because I realize many people aren’t sure what to do with persimmons. Some people even claim to dislike them. But I don't really believe them. Though its true persimmons can be confusing.


You see there are 2 types. Fuyu persimmons are squat like a bright orange tomato and are eaten while crunchy. They are great simply sliced and eaten out of hand. But they also shine in winter salads. I really defy anyone to say they don't like fuyu persimmons. It's like saying, "I don't like apples".

It's the other type of persimmon, Hachiya, that has convinced folks that they don't, can't or won't eat persimmons. Hachiya are more acorn shaped, more red than orange– and are abruptly tannic when under-ripe. Grimace your face and run from the room tannic. Hachiya persimmons must be squishy soft before eaten. At that point their flesh is like jelly. You can cut one in half and spoon its soft sweetness into your mouth. You can freeze them and do the same thing– enjoying them like the sweetest most exotic sorbet imaginable.

But there are other ways to enjoy them also. Their sweet pulp, when pureed, is as smooth as pudding. Making it a terrific ingredient for baking. It's the star of this dense and moist– perfect for the holidays– cake. It's a luxurious cake. Packed full of raisins and walnuts. At first bite it might seem not quite sweet enough. But keep eating. Just like the promise of Christmas, this cake's unexpected pleasures are not as obvious as they seem, and they don't last forever. GREG


Persimmon Pudding Cake serves 12 CLICK here for a printable recipe
1/4 c brandy
1 c raisins or dried currants
6 very ripe hachiya persimmons
3 large eggs, lightly beaten
1 1/2 c whole milk
1 t vanilla extract
6 T melted butter, slightly cooled
2 T honey
1/2 c sugar
1 1/4 cg all-purpose flour
1/2 t kosher salt
1 t baking soda
1 t baking powder
1 1/2 c coursely chopped toasted walnuts
2 c whipped cream (optional)
Place the oven rack in the center position and preheat the oven  to 350 degrees F.
Butter the bottom and sides of a 10-inch springform pan. Place a round of parchment on the bottom.
Place the  raisins in a small bowl and pour the brandy over. Let soften about 20 minutes.
Cut the persimmons in half, then scoop the pulp from the skins and place the pulp in a large bowl. Discard skins. Mash the pulp with a fork until until smooth. Add the lightly beaten eggs, milk, vanilla, honey, melted butter and sugar. Stir to combine.
In a separate large bowl, combine flour, salt, baking soda, and baking powder. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients in 3 additions. Stirring to combine between each addition. Fold in the raisins and any remaining brandy along with the walnuts. Pour the batter into the prepared pan. It should come to about 1-inch from the top. Don't overfill. Place the filled pan a a rimmed baking sheet and transfer to the heated oven.
Bake until the cake has risen, is firm to the touch and begins to pull away from the sides of the pan, about 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 hours. Remove from oven and let cool on a wire rack. Once cool run a small knife along the edge to loosen the cake from the pan, then remove ring. Cut into wedges and serve with whipped cream, if using.
Source: Adapted from CIA Greystone

Kyle (Resident Foodie)
 
April 18, 2012 | Kyle (Resident Foodie)

Fresh-Pulled Mozzarella at V. Sattui

 

Our chef, Gerardo Sainato, a native of Naples, Italy, with his well-practiced hands reaches deep into almost boiling water to twist and pull the soft white mass of curds, stretching and shaping slowly into perfectly smooth, creamy balls of warm fresh mozzarella. We offer own cheese daily and host a Mozzarella Bar every weekend (Spring through Fall) for our guests to enjoy with our wine as they sit under the oaks next to the Winery.

 

Mozzarella Bar
Grilled Italian bread, heirloom tomatoes, fresh basil, the best olive oils and balsamic vinegars complement our fresh mozzarella. Adding the choices of roasted peppers with golden raisins and pine nuts, olive tapenade and roasted whole garlic, our Fresh Mozzarella Bar has become a huge hit with our summer guests and a favorite memory when paired with a bottle of V. Sattui wine. Try it when you visit again. Our Mozzarella Bar will make your weekend at V. Sattui an unforgettable culinary memory!

Our Mozzarella Bar Saturday & Sunday from 11:30 am to 3:30 pm.

Time Posted: Apr 18, 2012 at 12:25 PM
Kyle (Resident Foodie)
 
March 22, 2012 | Kyle (Resident Foodie)

Move Over, Olive Oil… V. Sattui’s in the Grapeseed Oil Business!

After years of featuring the award-winning, premium-quality Salute Santé! Grapeseed Oil in our own Marketplace and recipes, V. Sattui Winery became partners in this small family-run Napa company back in 2006.

Salute Santé! Grapeseed Oil has long been the secret of gourmet chefs who love its light and nutty, yet neutral flavor. It has the unique ability to enhance the flavors of ingredients instead of overpowering them and leaves no greasy aftertaste! It makes savory marinades and salad dressings that will not cloud when chilled, so you can use them right out of the refrigerator. The high smoke point (485 F) makes it ideal for hot food preparation which means you can sauté, fry or bake without any smoking, splattering or burning. The excellent emulsification properties make it ideal for whipping mayonnaise and creamy dressings that will not separate when chilled.

The Salute Santé! Infused Grapeseed Oils shine with delicious fresh flavors, making them ideal as a liquid spice in all your cooking or as a simple and delicious dip for bread in place of butter or margarine.

It’s Ecological!

Salute Santé! Grapeseed Oil is an ecologically sound product that is made from the seeds of grapes after the wine is pressed. There is no need for hybrid or genetically engineered crops, nor does it require new farmland, crops or water to produce.

It's Healthy

Salute Santé! means “to your health” in Italian and French. Grapeseed oil is high in vitamin E and is 76% essential fatty acid, linoleic acid (also known as Omega 6). It is low in saturated fat, contains natural chlorophyll and valuable antioxidants (known as proanthocyninidins). Studies have shown a unique ability that may significantly raise HDL cholesterol (the "good" cholesterol), lower LDL cholesterol (the "bad" cholesterol) and triglycerides; the effect of which may lower your risk of cardiovascular disease and impotency, something that no other food product has been known to do!

It contains NO cholesterol, NO sodium and NO preservatives such as TBHQ or BHT. It is NOT hydrogenated and contains NO solvents, NO trans-fatty acids or free fatty acids.

Check out thier products at /Wine-Shop/Wine-Gifts---Accessories/Foods

Time Posted: Mar 22, 2012 at 2:30 PM
 
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