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Alisha  Lamos
 
November 21, 2013 | Alisha Lamos

Monica & Bill's October Wedding

With the sun just starting to fade over the horizon, Monica walked down the aisle looking absolutely radiant as she stood next to Bill for their October ceremony.  The long tables looked beautiful in the Barrel Room for an elegant dinner reception.  Thank you Richard Wood for sharing photos from their special day, and congratulatiosn Monica and Bill!

 

Time Posted: Nov 21, 2013 at 5:33 PM
Alisha  Lamos
 
November 21, 2013 | Alisha Lamos

Sara & Kevin's October Wedding

Autumn in Napa brings the energy of grape harvest, the bright colors of leaves turning golden and red, and the beauty of a love story!  V. Sattui winery was all the more excited this October to host the wedding of Sara and Kevin.  Aftern their lawn ceremony,  the couple welcomed their guests to the candlelit Barrel Room for dinner and dancing, and offered s'mores and a lounge space in the courtyard.  Richard Wood captured and shared their special day.  Cheers to Sara and Kevin and hope to see you both again soon!

 

 

Time Posted: Nov 21, 2013 at 4:21 PM
V. Sattui Winery
 
November 19, 2013 | V. Sattui Winery

Happy National Zinfandel Day

Zinfandel arrived in the United States in the 1820s and was first cultivated along the East Coast. It was brought to California in the 1850s and by the late 19th century was the state's most widely planted grape. It was very popular with home winemakers during Prohibition, but its reputation declined in the years following repeal. The grape was generally relegated to workhorse status. That began to change in the mid-to-late 1960s as winemakers and savvy drinkers began to discover the elegance and versatility that great Zinfandel could offer. Credit Ridge Vineyards of Saratoga, founded in 1962, for putting a serious face on the grape with their ground-breaking single vineyard wines.

V. Sattui’s Zinfandels were first released in 1975 with only a modest blend and a single Howell Mountain bottling. We now offer eight different vineyard-designated Zins, each distinctive and representative of its origin. SHOP NOW >>

FROM THE VIDEO ARCHIVES: Watch the Wine Guys explain the term "old Vine" Zinfandel

 

Time Posted: Nov 19, 2013 at 1:26 PM
Kyle (Resident Foodie)
 
November 18, 2013 | Kyle (Resident Foodie)

Day-After-Thanksgiving Turkey Soup

 

 

1 quart brown chicken stock

1 quart vegetable stock

1 turkey carcass, with meat removed

2 bay leaves

12 whole black peppercorns

2 tablespoons grapeseed or olive oil

2 garlic gloves, smashed and chopped

1 onion, small diced

1 carrot, small diced

1 stalk of celery, small diced

3 cups mixed vegetables

3 cups dark turkey meat, small to medium diced

2 teaspoons dried thyme

1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary

1 tablespoon chopped fresh italian parsley

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Remove the turkey carcass and discard. Strain the stockpot contents into a container and set aside.1.  Put the stock, turkey carcass, 1 bay leaf and 6 peppercorns in a stock pot and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer for one hour, uncovered.

In a large soup pot over medium heat add the oil and garlic. Stir until the garlic just starts to brown. Add the onion, carrot and celery and stir. Reduce the heat to medium-low and continue cooking for about 7 minutes, stirring often. Add the stock, remaining bay leaf and peppercorns and bring to a simmer. Add the mixed vegetables, turkey, thyme and rosemary seasoning. Bring to a simmer, cover, turn off the heat and let sit five minutes. Remove the bay leaf and season with salt and pepper to taste. The peppercorns will sink to the bottom. Serve in warm soup bowls.


Serves 8

V. Sattui Winery
 
November 14, 2013 | V. Sattui Winery

Consider Big Bottles…Size Matters

 

 

Size Does Matter!

When it comes to bottle sizes, the bigger the bottle, the greater potential for aging wines for the long term. Here’s why: the space between the top of the wine in the bottle and the bottom of the cork is referred to as the ullage. This space contains a very limited amount of air, which over time, oxidizes the wine very slowly. This slow, oxidative process is part of the magic that happens in a bottle of wine as it ages and it allows the wine to mellow and soften. Over time, corks also allow a minute amount of oxygen into the bottle, further accelerating the aging process.

The oxidation rate in bottled wine is a function of the ratio of air to wine in the bottle and the length of time of aging. Because big bottles contain more wine with about the same amount of ullage, these bottles can age much longer, compared with the traditional 750ml bottle, and can achieve complexities and flavors unique to their size. Large format bottles also allow us to drink older vintages long after 750ml bottlings have become old and tired. For these reasons, big bottles are preferred by collectors and wine enthusiasts.

Magnum to Nebuchadnezzar

Wine bottles range in size from the airline 187ml (quarter of a bottle) to sovereign, a bottle that holds 67 bottles or nearly six cases of wine (now that’s a party wine!) Each year, we bottle a limited number of magnums (2 bottles), double magnums (4 bottles), imperials (8 bottles) and Nebuchadnezzars (equal to 20 bottles) of our Preston and Morisoli Vineyard and Reserve Cabernets. 

We guarantee that you will be the biggest hit at your next party if you show up with one of these gargantuan bottles. The wax seal is brittle and breaks off easily with a few raps of a dinner knife handle or similar blunt object, and please be sure to use a good waiter’s corkscrew and pull slowly and straight!  How do you pour wine from a big bottle? Very carefully.

We have listed the most recent vintages in magnum and double magnum online.

Click here to shop large format wines

For older vintages and larger formats call 707-963-7774

 

Time Posted: Nov 14, 2013 at 9:47 AM
V. Sattui Winery
 
November 5, 2013 | V. Sattui Winery

Wish You Were Here!

 

 

There are few experiences greater than being in the Napa Valley in Autumn. Driving around at night when the air becomes colder and heavy, you can smell deep, profound aromas emanating from the pressed skins (called pomace) in the vineyards which literally perfume the air.

……….And the colors!! Vibrant colors bounce off a mantle of green grass brought about by fall rains. Did you ever wonder why certain vineyards become yellow and others red or both? Probably not. Well, without becoming too technical here is what you don’t see. The petiole (leaf stem) swells with the onset of colder and longer nights which does two things. It causes the Palisade layers in the leaf to collapse and chlorophyll production ceases turning the leaf yellow instead of green.

Secondly, at this time of year, all of the vine’s energy is now headed for the roots where it will be stored for bud break and initial shoot development next spring. Some vines and vineyards have contracted virus infections carried by mealy bugs or nematodes. This interferes with the movement of fluids in the vine and some of the anthocyanins (the stuff that makes tannin in wine) are trapped in the leaves turning them completely red or a mottled red. Some examples are Red Leaf Roll and Red Leaf Mosaic which effects the leaves more than the vines. The vines will wake up around mid March, as they do every year, and they will be just fine. You probably will not be able to look at a vineyard the same way again. In any event, when you are about to enjoy a glass of V. Sattui wine, just give our vineyards a little mental toast for all of the hard work they do.

Time Posted: Nov 5, 2013 at 12:00 AM
 
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